Claims, claims, claims.

I follow an industry news site on supplements. Today they talked about the blatant lies told by many supplement vendors. Here’s a comment left on the article.

free radicals…sellers of dietary supplements are ruthless when it comes to marketing their products – they will tell the customer what he wants to hear, not the truth, necessarily.

A popular supplement with anti-oxidant qualities is Chaga, which is based on a medicinal fungus. Chaga became a hype, due to health-gurus like David Wolfe. Many supplement sellers are now piggybacking on this hype.

The health claims made for Chaga are in general simply idiotic and based on copy-pasting poorly understood or purely invented numbers and statements from the internet, without ever looking into sources. This includes the anti-oxidant claims, which are in general based on alleged research from TUFTS University (US). However, this university never researched Chaga, according to their own statement, but the anti-oxidant claims based on this alleged research are found everywhere. SOD value: xxxx units!!!! (SOD is destroyed in the stomach, so it’s useless to consume it orally, but this is a side note…) And it’s impossible to fight this misinformation. Because of human nature.

People prefer beautiful lies, every time.”

Here at AlkaWay we are beset with a problem of the opposite kind. We have discovered that molecular hydrogen is a different sort of antioxidant than any other in that it ‘discriminates’ between beneficial free radicals and nasty ones like the dreaded Hydroxyl ion. The dominant (marketing) paradigm says that all free radicals are bad, but this is far from the truth. Many free radicals are in our bodies to support us as natural ‘janitors’ cleaning up (through oxidation) junk DNA and other detritis. But.. how do we tell people that an inert gas can do this better than any other heavily promoted antioxidant?