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Fitter but Fatter

An article yesterday In Treehugger suggests that we have to have good diet along with a good exercise regimen, quoting a growing trend for Americans getting fitter, but fatter.

“In order to find out how much Americans are exercising, the University of Washington conducted a study based on thousands of responses collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The number of women who exercise ‘sufficiently’ rose from 50.7 percent in 2001 to 59.2 percent in 2011. For men, it rose from 59.4 percent to 61.3 percent. And yet, for every percentage point increase in exercise, there was only a 0.11 percent lower likelihood of obesity, and obesity rates overall have risen during the decade of study. Clearly something isn’t adding up.”

The article is on the money when the author says:

“Engaging in 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week will accomplish little if someone continues to eat large quantities of greasy, salty processed food, high-glycemic carbohydrates, and sugar. It’s impossible to isolate exercise from diet when trying to lose weight, and inevitably there comes a point when a poor diet will inhibit progress, no matter how much a person exercises.”

However then it devolves to the standard response of

” If more people adjusted their diets to focus on healthy-sized portions of fresh vegetables and fruit, whole grains, lean meats or fish, nuts and seeds, I suspect obesity rates would plummet in the U.S., even if exercise rates didn’t increase significantly. Like it or not, it all starts with nutrition.”

Same old, same old. Lean meats, wholegrains, seeds.

child teeth remineralizingI absolutely reject this. Good fat won’t make you fat IF you give up the sugar and the grains. Good fat will change your energy to a fatburner rather than a sugar and carb sugar. And to give you a really good example of how profoundly the correct diet affects us, take a look at this website showing a baby’s teeth development when it is given a good diet.

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These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.

By IAN HAMILTON

On Key

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